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Musical
001 - Kid Boots (1923)
Musique: Harry Tierney
Paroles: Joseph McCarthy
Livret: Otto Harbech • William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
1 version mentionnée
Dispo: Génèse  Liste chansons  


Musical
002 - Ziegfeld Follies of 1924 (1924)
Musique: Dave Stamper • Dr. Albert Szirmai • Harry Tierney • Raymond Hubbell • Victor Herbert
Paroles: Gene Buck • Joseph McCarthy
Livret: Will Rogers • William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
1 version mentionnée
Dispo:


Musical
003 - Rosalie (1928)
Musique: George Gershwin • Sigmund Romberg
Paroles: Ira Gershwin • P. G. Wodehouse
Livret: Guy Bolton • William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
1 version mentionnée
Dispo: Résumé  Commentaire  Génèse  Liste chansons  


Musical
004 - Three Musketeers (The) (Friml) (1928)
Musique: Rudolf Friml
Paroles: Clifford Grey • P. G. Wodehouse
Livret: William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
3 versions mentionnées
Dispo: Résumé  Génèse  Liste chansons  


Musical
005 - Whoopee! (1928)
Musique: Walter Donaldson
Paroles: Gus Kahn
Livret: William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
2 versions mentionnées
Dispo: Résumé  Génèse  Liste chansons  


Musical
006 - Show Girl (1929)
Musique: George Gershwin
Paroles: Gus Kahn • Ira Gershwin
Livret: William Anthony McGuire
Production originale: Florenz Ziegfeld
1 version mentionnée
Dispo: Résumé  Commentaire  Génèse  Liste chansons  


Musical
007 - Smiles (1930)
Musique: Vincent Youmans
Paroles: Clifford Grey • Harold Adamson
Livret: William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
1 version mentionnée
Dispo: Résumé  Génèse  Liste chansons  


Film
008 - Rosalie (film) (1937)
Musique: Cole Porter
Paroles:
Livret: William Anthony McGuire
Production originale:
0 version mentionnée
Dispo:


Version 1

Rosalie (1928-01-New Amsterdam Theatre-Broadway)

Type de série: Original
Théâtre: New Amsterdam Theatre (Broadway - Etats-Unis)
Durée : 9 mois 3 semaines
Nombre : 335 représentations
Première Preview : Tuesday 10 January 1928
Première : Tuesday 10 January 1928
Dernière : Saturday 27 October 1928
Mise en scène : William Anthony McGuire
Chorégraphie : Seymour Felix
Producteur :
Commentaires : Une production de Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr.

Version 2

Show Girl (1929-07-Ziegfield Theatre-Broadway)

Type de série: Original
Théâtre: Ziegfield Theatre (Broadway - Etats-Unis)
Durée : 3 mois
Nombre : 111 représentations
Première Preview : Tuesday 02 July 1929
Première : Tuesday 02 July 1929
Dernière : Saturday 05 October 1929
Mise en scène : William Anthony McGuire
Chorégraphie :
Producteur :
Avec : Jimmie (later known as Jimmy) Durante (Sombre Eyes, Snozzle), Calvin Thomas (Colonel Witherby, Stage Manager), Althea Heinly (Aunt Jennie, Estelle), Barbara Newberry (Virginia Witherby, Sunshine), Matthew Smith (Robert Adams), Blaien Cordner (Steve), Andy Jochim (Frank, Mr. Wright), Wanda Stevenson (Bessie), Noel Francis (Peggy Ritz), Lou Clayton (Gypsy), Eddie Jackson (Deacon, Tony Morato), Joseph Macaulay (Alvarez Romano), Doris Carson (Raquel), Frank McHugh (Jimmy Doyle), Howard Morgan (Matt Brown), Ruby Keeler (also billed as Ruby Keeler Jolson) (Dixie Dugan), Caryl Bergman (Anna, Sylvia), Eddie Foy Jr. (Denny Kerrigan), Kathryn Hereford (Bobby), Nick Lucas (Rudy), Austin Fairman (John Milton), Sadie Duff (Mrs. Dugan); Duke Ellington and His Cotton Club Orchestra; The Albertina Rasch Dancers: Mildred Turner, Vera Frederick, Virginia Whitmore, Lucille O’Connor, Agatha Johann, Virginia Allen, Ruth Hayden, Dorothy Morgan, Evelyn Nichols, Dona Dene Curry, Sunny Van, Ruth Love, Viola Hage, Eddie Belmont, Dorothy Ryan, Louise Raymond; Show Girls: Althea Heinly, Blanche Satchel, Gertrude Dahl, Mary MacDonald, Ada Landis, Edna Bunte, Betty Bassett, Mildred Schwenke, Moreen Holmes, Dorothy Carrigan, Dolores De Fina, Doris Downes, Caja Eric, Georgia Payne, Camilla Lanier, Mildred Klaw, Leonia Pennington; Dancers: Pat O’Keefe, Virginia Frank, Cleo Cullen, Bobby Brodsley, Jean Althan, Selma Althan, Jane Barry, Peggy Carthew, Beatrice Powers, Dolores Grant, Pamela Bryant, Janet Gibbard, Dorothy Bow, Lois Peck, Vivian Porter, Florence Allen, Virginia Case, Katherine Downer, Juliette Jones, Doris May, Patricia McGrath, Orine Bryne, Rena Landeau, Claire Wayne, Jean Wayne, Alma Drange, Mildred De Fina, Lottie Marcy, Dolores Ray, Hazel Bofinger, Kae English, Marcia Bell, Emily Burton, Billie Cortez, Wanda Stevenson, Violet Dell, Dore Nodine
Presse : J. Brooks Atkinson in the Times noted that Ziegfeld had given the show a “lustrous splendor,” but the “task of blending materials that are episodic and individual” made the new musical “the least notable” of Ziegfeld’s recent shows. Throughout the evening you were “constantly aware of banalities and awkward transitions” and you missed “the stately flow of the best Ziegfeld pageants.” Keeler was now “on her way to fame on Broadway” and was an “enjoyable” performer “without pretentions and affectations,” and while Durante’s “personality” managed to batter “through all barriers,” his “sizzling energy” and “spluttering, insane material” didn’t “melt gracefully into a musical comedy book.” Gershwin’s contributions had “moments of vividness or melody,” but he hadn’t composed “a first-rate score.”

Charles Brackett in the New Yorker found the adaptation “soggily” written, and noted it was Gershwin’s “weakest” score, and Burns Mantle in the Tampa Tribune said the “elaborate and bountifully decorated” show was “the nearest thing” to a financial “miss” that Ziegfeld had produced during the past five years (perhaps he’d forgotten about Betsy).

But Percy Hammond in the Oakland (CA) Tribune said Show Girl was “as satisfactory a musical show as I have ever seen,” and while he noted that Jolson’s “Liza” was a “priceless moment,” it nonetheless “detracted a little” from Keeler’s “brilliant success.” Grace Cutler in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle said that for the “entertaining” show Urban had “outdone himself in scenic effects” and Keeler excelled “in voice, in gesture, [and] routine tap-dancing.” But Gershwin’s music was (with the exception of “Do What You Do!”) a “little disappointing,” Durante was “hampered” by his fellow comics, and Foy “by no means” made the most of his part.

Frederick F. Schrader in the Cincinnati Enquirer said “the most pleasing feature” of the musical was Urban’s décor; otherwise, Gershwin’s score was “breezy” and “sometimes original.” Variety decided the show’s “main trouble” was the “music and the lack of it in a popular way,” but noted Durante got a “peach spot” for two of his specialties, including the “bear” of a song “So I Ups to Him” (the critic reported that the “house rocked” with Durante’s “snapper” line that someone was a “fairy”).

Ward Greene in the Indianapolis Star noted that Whoopee made Keeler famous, “especially when she walked out on the show,” that her marriage to Jolson “hit the front pages of a hundred cities,” and “as a dancer not even Marilyn Miller in her gayest days excels Ruby.” But in regard to Jolson’s “Liza” moment, Greene suspected Jolson might not “continue to give this little surprise party to his darling wife,” who “in time” might “appreciate it less and less.”

Version 3

Smiles (1930-11-Ziegfeld Theatre-Broadway)

Type de série: Original
Théâtre: Ziegfield Theatre (Broadway - Etats-Unis)
Durée : 1 mois 3 semaines
Nombre : 63 représentations
Première Preview : Tuesday 18 November 1930
Première : Tuesday 18 November 1930
Dernière : Saturday 10 January 1931
Mise en scène : William Anthony McGuire
Chorégraphie :
Producteur :
Avec : Arline Aber (Arline), Charline Aber (Charline), Jean Ackerman (Mrs. Brown, Lilian), Larry Adler (Larry), Pirko AlquistAdele Astaire (Dot Hastings), Fred Astaire (Bob Hastings), Mabel Baade (Ensemble), Elsie Behrens (Ensemble), Joey Benton (Ensemble), Virginia Biddle (Ensemble), Dorothy Bow (Ensemble), Bobby Broadsley (Ensemble), Virginia Bruce (Ensemble), Pamela Bryant (Ensemble), Katherine Burke (Ann), Georgia Caine (Mrs. Hastings), Irving Carter (Ensemble), Gordon Clark (Ensemble), Frank Coletti (Slim), Betty Collette (Ensemble), Mary Collins (Mother Jones), Walter Costello (Ensemble), Gertrude Dahl (Ensemble), Louis Delgado (Mr. Green), Clare Dodd (Clara), Marion Dodge (Ensemble), Betty Dumbris (Ensemble), Madeline Dunbar (Ensemble), Marcelle Edwards (Ensemble), Georgia Ellis (Ensemble), Caja Eric (Ensemble), Louise Estes (Ensemble), Dorothy Flood (Ensemble), Eddie Foy, Jr. (Gilbert Stone), Agnes Franey (Ensemble), Paul Gregory (Dick), Maxine Gross (Ensemble), Burnie Halloway (Ensemble), Kathryn Hereford (Pat), Maurine Holmes (Ensemble), Bob Hope (Ensemble), Meredith Howard (Ensemble), Tom Howard (Holy Joe), Ken Huntington (Ensemble), Jackie Hurlbut (Ensemble), Lorraine Jaillet (Madelon), David Johns (Ensemble), Juliette Jordan (Ensemble), Bernard Jukes (Doughface), Harriette Lake (), Marjorie LaVoe (Ensemble), Preston Lewis (Ensemble), Neva Lynn (Ensemble), Joe Lyons (Mackin), Roy Mace (Ensemble), Martha Maggard (Ensemble), Pat Mann (Izzy Cohen), Christine Maple (Ensemble), Rose Mariella (Ensemble), Doris May (Ensemble), Nellie Mayer (Ensemble), Constance McKenzie (Ensemble), Olive McLay (Ensemble), Marilyn Miller (Smiles), Joseph Minitello (Ensemble), Hilda Moreno (Kiki), Ruth Morgan (Miss Parker), Patsy O'Day (Ensemble), Agnes O'Laughlin (Ensemble), Dorothy Patterson (Ensemble), Ruth Patterson (Betty), Peggy Peacock (Ensemble), Edward Raquello (Pierre), Dolores Ray (Ensemble), Anna Rex (Ensemble), Adrian Rosely (Tony), Olga Royce (Ensemble), Charles Sager (Chang Lang Foo), Blanche Satchell (Ensemble), Phil Sheridan (Ensemble), Jack Spinello (Ensemble), Michael Stark (Ensemble), Ward Tallman (Ensemble), Ruth Tara (Ensemble), Norma Taylor (Ensemble), Harry Tighe (Officer Dennis O'Brien), Lee Timmins (Ensemble), Helen Walsh (Ensemble), Jean Warren (Ensemble), Gil White (First Sailor)

Version 4

Three Musketeers (The) (Friml) (1928-03-Lyric Theatre-Broadway)

Type de série: Original
Théâtre: Lyric Theatre (Broadway - Etats-Unis)
Durée : 9 mois 1 semaine
Nombre : 318 représentations
Première Preview : Tuesday 13 March 1928
Première : Tuesday 13 March 1928
Dernière : Saturday 15 December 1928
Mise en scène : William Anthony McGuire
Chorégraphie :
Producteur :
Avec : Robert D. Burns (Sergeant Jussac), Louis Hector (Comte de la Rochefort), Harrison Brockbank (Innkeeper), Naomi Johnson (Zoe), Vivienne Osborne (Lady De Winter), Detmar Poppen (Porthos), Douglass R. Dumbrille (Athos), Joseph Macaulay (Aramis), Vivienne Segal (Constance Bonacieux), Lester Allen (Planchet), Dennis King (D’Artagnan), John Clarke (The Duke of Buckingham), Yvonne D’Arle (Queen Anne), John Kline (M. de Treville), Reginald Owen (Cardinal Richelieu), Clarence Derwent (Louis XIII), William Kershaw (Brother Joseph), Harriet Hoctor (Premiere Danseuse of the Court), Catherine Hayes (Aubergiste), Richard Thornton (The Bo’sun), Raymond O’Brien (Patrick); Cardinal’s Guards: Andy Jochim and Randolph Leyman; Ladies in Waiting: Evelyn Groves, Lee Russell, Gertrude Williams, Mary McDonald, Pirkko Ahlquist, Marion Dodge, and Edna Bunte; Gerald Moore (King’s Attendant) The Albertina Rasch Dancers: Virginia Beardsley, Dona Desne Curry, Rose Gale, Eva Hellesnes, Marguerite Eisele, Nora Puntin, Louise Raymond, Yvonne Beaupre, Regina Tushinsky, Nona Otero, Lydia Krushinsky, Lucille O’Connor, Wilma Kaye, Helen Derby, Jeanette Bradley, Mildred Turner; Ladies of the Ensemble: Nancy Corrigan, Lillian White, Pauline Hall, Vida Hanna, Eleanor Buffington, Marie Merrifield, Julia Lane, Esther Peters, Sylvia Derby, Margaret Clarke, Byrdetta Evans, Eleanor Little, Emily Hadley, Libby Hanley, Ivy Palmer, Marye Bern, Frances Kelley, Lotta Marcy, Ann Moss, Helen Withers, Elaine Lank, Katherine Cavelli, Audrey Davis, Sally Hadley, Ellen Moray, Joan Marren, Hilda Steiner, Elsie Reign, Dorothy Greenley, Miriam Stockton, Dorothy Sutton, Margaret Valient; Gentlemen of the Ensemble: Martin Sheppard, A. Muzzi, Glen McCauley, John Zak, Ernest Ehler, Harry James, William Dillon, Armand Van Mueller, William Hagen, Robert Shields, Norman Ives, Stanley Howard, Charles Kirby, L. Dumbadse, Ivan Ismailov, Serge Vino
Presse : J. Brooks Atkinson in the New York Times said the operetta was “lavishly” mounted in Ziegfeld’s “bounteous style” and was “a matchless achievement in design and expression.” William Anthony McGuire’s “excellent libretto” created “bold” characters engaged in “drinking, loving and fighting in the service of royalty,” and the story was complemented by Friml’s “rushing” and “captivating” score. Those who had read Dumas’s novel would find the evening “vivid, ebullient and bubbling,” and already some were dubbing the new work a “grand operetta.” As for King, he sang and acted in “the grand manner.” Charles Brackett in the New Yorker noted that King acquitted himself “with grace” but seemed “a trifle orchidaceous in comparison with the Fairbanks interpretation of the character” (Douglas Fairbanks had starred in a 1921 silent film adaptation). Otherwise, the décor was “lavish,” the Albertina Rasch dancers possessed “hypnotic grace,” and Friml had composed a “good, thick, rambunctious score.” Mary Ann Miller in the Indianapolis Star said the score was “rousing” and the libretto “worthy of Dumas’ swashbuckling novel.” The work was “a most skillfully artistic production, directed with a fine discernment and acted as a spirited and humorous romance.” Arthur Pollock in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle singled out “Ma Belle” and “(March of the) Musketeers” as the score’s best songs, and suggested the evening would have been better served had it been shorter. Further, the book was somewhat austere and needed to be “a little louder, more hilarious, gustier—something looser, more pungent, racier and red-eyed.” As a result, the production “just misse[d] being good enough to go on until midnight.” Time summed up the plot by noting that D’Artagnan and the Three Musketeers spend their time “serving the King of France” and “making love to ladies.” The chorus girls “capered” about the stage dressed in “wide skirts and bonnets,” and if “equipped with dusters” they’d “look as if they had just jumped out of a can of glorified Dutch Cleanser.” Percy Hammond in the Pittsburgh Press praised the “melodious” score and said King had “the voice of a nightingale, the shape of Apollo, the charm of Laurette Taylor, the valor of a U.S. Marine, the punch of Eugene Tunney, and the impishness of Puck.” During the run, four songs were cut, “My Sword (and I),” “Te Deum,” “Heart of Mine,” and “Until We Say Goodbye,” and three were added, “Every Little While,” “Your Eyes,” and “Gascony” (aka “Gascony Song” and “Gascony Bred”). Dropped during the tryout were “One Smile from You,” “Shipmates All,” “Noah,” and “Near You.”