Finborough Theatre
Londres - Angleterre

Construction:

Topologie du théâtre

Nombre de salles actives: 1
Salle 1: (50)    - Actif

Accès

En métro:
En bus:
Adresse:

Evolution

Bâtiment:
Nom:

Propriétaire(s)


Remarquable

50 
- Actif

Théâtre
Revival

12) Home Chat (Revival)

Joué durant  3 semaines

Première preview: Inconnu
Première: mar. 30 août 2016
Dernière: sam. 24 septembre 2016

Compositeur:  
Parolier:  
Libettiste: Noël Coward •  
Metteur en scène: Martin Parr •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Polly Adams, Tim Chipping, Philip Correia, Joanna David, Richard Dempsey, Nelly Harker, Robert Hazle, Clare Lawrence Moody, Zoe Waites. 


Commentaire: A unique rediscovery in its first UK production since its premiere in 1927.  (plus) 


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Théâtre
Original Broadway

11) This Was a Man (Original Broadway)

Joué durant  2 semaines

Première preview: Inconnu
Première: mar. 15 juillet 2014
Dernière: sam. 02 août 2014

Compositeur:  
Parolier:  
Libettiste: Noël Coward •  
Metteur en scène: Belinda Lang •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Nicholas Audsley (Bobby), Alex Corbert Burcher (Harry), Jamie De Courcey (Edward), Dorothea Myer-Bennett (Carol), Robert Portal (Evelyn), Georgina Rylance (Zoe), Grace Thurgood (Margot). 


Commentaire:   


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Revival

10) Roar of the Greasepaint (The) (Revival)

Joué durant  3 semaines

Première preview: mar. 07 juin 2011
Première: jeu. 09 juin 2011
Dernière: sam. 02 juillet 2011

Compositeur: Anthony Newley • Leslie Bricusse •  
Parolier: Anthony Newley • Leslie Bricusse •  
Libettiste: Anthony Newley • Leslie Bricusse •  
Metteur en scène: Ian Judge •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Matthew Ashforde (Cocky), Oliver Beamish (Sir), Terry Doe (The Negro), Jennifer Done, Samantha Giffard, Louisa Maxwell, Beth Morrissey, Elizabeth Rowden, Tanya Shields, Charlotte Silver, Hannah Wilding 


Commentaire: This fringe-theatre version was its London premiere. The critics decided the score was undoubtedly worth the cost of the ticket, but at the same time you were obliged to sit through “wearisome philosophising, a lack of narrative drive, and satire that is always sacrificed to saccharine” (Guardian)  (plus) 


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Original Europe

9) Bed and Sofa (Original Europe)

Joué durant  3 semaines

Première preview: mar. 29 mars 2011
Première: jeu. 31 mars 2011
Dernière: sam. 23 avril 2011

Compositeur: Polly Pen •  
Parolier: Laurence Klaven •  
Libettiste:  
Metteur en scène: Luke Sheppard •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Alastair Brookshaw / Kaisa Hammarlund / Alastair Parker / Penelope Keith (voice - The Announcer) 


Commentaire: Nominated for five Off West End Awards including
Best Production
Best Director for Luke Sheppard
Best Female Performance for Kaisa Hammarlund
Best Designer for David Woodhead
Best Lighting Designer for Howard Hudson  (plus) 


Presse: "Kaisa Hammerlund is simply stunning as Ludmilla, encompassing perfectly all complexities of this torn woman" Jennifer Reischel, Fringe Review

‎"It is quite astounding to see a small (extremely well conducted) orchestra residing near the ceiling above the action" Jennifer Reischel, Fringe Review

‎"A startlingly honest and wonderfully expressive musical version of a lost art form with a haunting score, where not their conversation but the actors' facial expressions and gesturing become a focal point in understanding their feelings and journey." Jennifer Reischel, Fringe Review

‎"This is the most delightfully unusual musical to see at the Finborough.... It is ingeniously designed with the tiny flat complete and in character while the string musicians perform the music with a sense of delightfully warm tones on the roof of the flat... It is a completely jelled production....a gem that sparkles and brings a wit with compassion. Don't miss it." Blanche Marvin, London Theatre Reviews

‎"as pleasant added bonuses we get the recorded voice of Penelope Keith reading some of the film's ironic between-scenes commentary, and a delightful little toy train." Gerald Berkowitz, London Theatre Guide

‎"Under the direction of Luke Sheppard and the musical direction of Candida Caldicot, Alistair Parker (husband), Kaisa Hammarlund (wife) and Alistair Brookshaw (boarder) sing beautifully and capture all the quiet humour of the story" Gerald Berkowitz, London Theatre Guide

‎"There is a nicely witty edge to a song in which the woman realises that both she and the USSR government have bad luck in choosing their men, and a melodic trio in which the three sing of their separate dreams is lovely and satisfyingly complex in a Sondheimish way, recalling the 'Soon/Now/Later' trio in A Little Night Music while retaining its own individual sound." Gerald Berkowitz, London Theatre Guide

‎"A shower of five stars for all: the performers, the creative team, and especially to Luke Sheppard, who directs with a fine-tuned sensitivity and an excellence that belies his years. Very impressive: if the run doesn't sell out, I'll eat my shapka." Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide

‎"It is impossible to take one's eyes off Kaisa Hammarlund - her performance and singing are captivating, commanding." Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide

‎"The scene at the movies was so focused I couldn't resist turning my head in case more magic was taking place behind me. But the magic was in front of me." Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide

‎"In pale commedia dell'arte faces and stylised movements the performers negotiate the tiny space deftly (credit to movement director Lucy Cullingford)." Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide

‎"The set is fabulous in its realism, replicated almost exactly, with its Stalin calendar and her photo on the wall. David Woodhead has squeezed in all the furniture and the Bolshoi pediment... Bulgakov's Professor Woland must have taken over the Finborough, for how else to explain that all fits with room to spare for an audience. Where there's a will..." Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide

‎"Her music (for violin, viola, cello, and piano/conductor) has Russian harmonies, his book and libretto gently mock faux Trotsky, Stalin and Marxist texts, delivered by Penelope Keith's voiceover announcer in exquisitely sardonic tones." Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide


‎"whether you are a fan of Soviet satire and Soviet films of the 1920s or not matters not a bit to delight in Polly Pen and Laurence Klavan's faithful but oh so witty rendering of Abram Room's 1927 silent movie" Vera Liber, British Theatre Guide

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Original Europe

8) Me and Juliet (Original Europe)

Joué durant  3 semaines

Première preview: mar. 05 octobre 2010
Première: jeu. 07 octobre 2010
Dernière: sam. 30 octobre 2010

Compositeur: Richard Rodgers •  
Parolier: Oscar Hammerstein II •  
Libettiste: Oscar Hammerstein II •  
Metteur en scène: Thom Southerland •  
Chorégraphe: Sally Brooks •  
Avec: Laura Main (Jeanie), John Addison (Bob), Robert Hands (Larry), Dafydd Gwyn Howells (Mac), Jodie Jacobs (Betty), Peter Kenworthy (Ruby), Gemma Atkins, Terry Doe, Daniella Gibb, Reeda Harris, Brendan Matthew, Stephen McGlynn, Tom O’Brien, Olivia O’Shea, Anthony Wise 


Commentaire: The show opened on Broadway on May 28 th 1953 and closed after 358 performances. It opened to an enormous advance, and had recovered its production costs within six months. When it closed, after ten months, it had made a small profit of $100,000, and later played a six week season in Chicago. For anyone except Rodgers and Hammerstein this would have represented a success, but the show is usually classed as a failure when compared to their other mega-hits. (An unknown Shirley MacLaine was in the chorus on Broadway, and an equally unknown Shirley Jones was in the Chicago chorus.). Subsequent short-run off-Broadway revivals were staged in 1970 and 2002, but the show has never had a major Broadway revival. This fringe theatre version was billed as its European premiere – 47 years after its first performance.  (plus) 


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Original London

7) Little Fish (Original London)

Joué durant  3 semaines

Première preview: mar. 27 octobre 2009
Première: jeu. 29 octobre 2009
Dernière: sam. 21 novembre 2009

Compositeur: Michael John LaChiusa •  
Parolier: Michael John LaChiusa •  
Libettiste: Michael John LaChiusa •  
Metteur en scène: Adam Lenson •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Julia Worsley (Charlotte), Michael Cantwell (Robert), Lee William-Davis (Marco), Laura Pitt-Pulford (Kathy), Katie Foster-Barnes (Anne), Nick Holder, Alana Maria, Ashley Campbell. 


Commentaire:   


Presse: “This quirky little show manages to make a surprisingly big splash.” Sam Marlowe, The Times

“The Finborough has found itself another great little musical, with a few well-crafted, rounded characters, some seriously enjoyable music and a cast full of delights.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“A worthy alternative to formulaic feel-good musicals.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“The influence of Sondheim — and in particular of Company, his study of metropolitan singleton life — hovers in the episodic plot in a score that sets the fidgety and dissonant alongside the soaringly melodic and in lyrics that are sometimes tender, often acerbic. There’s a hint of Gershwin to the music too, with Rhapsody in Blue tingeing the tunes just enough to trace an aural image of the Manhattan skyline.” Sam Marlowe, The Times

“This European premiere for one of Broadway's new writers brings a welcome, edgy musical to the stage” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“The first good thing to say about LaChiusa's music is that, unlike most young theatre composers of the past 40 years, he doesn't sound like imitation Sondheim or Lloyd Webber. He has his own melodic voice, simple and frequently wistful, and his best songs stand quite successfully on their own.” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“LaChiusa's spoken dialogue is frequently witty and incisive,” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“The best of the songs marry evocative lyrics to appropriate music. Perfect, about the need to accept the less-than-perfect, and Remember Me, about intimations of mortality and the value of friends, are particularly lovely and haunting, while Little Fish embodies the play's message without preaching and 90 Year Old Man captures a bit of urban imagery with a concise effectiveness Sondheim could envy.” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“What a difference a decade makes. Michael John LaChiusa's 2003 work, Little Fish, is a big leap away from First Lady Suite which I saw earlier in October and which frankly was rather a struggle. Little Fish is much easier to like and admire with less cliché and more insight in the lyrics and an altogether more appealing score: occasionally dissonant, but also occasionally beautifully melodic with well-turned pastiches.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“Julia Worsley’s accomplished central role.” Scott Matthewman, The Stage

“A fine central performance from Julia Worsley.” Sam Marlowe, The Times

“Julia Worsley is delightful as Charlotte, a recovering ex-girlfriend, insecure, anxious and quite remarkable.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“Julia Worsley is onstage and the focus of our attention uninterruptedly, and the actress carries the young woman through her slow learning curve with empathy and believability.” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“Several strong performances, notably from Julia Worsley as Charlotte and Lee William-Davis as Marco.” Theo Bosanquet, whatsonstage.com

“A strong cast is dominated by Laura Pitt-Pulford as the perky Kathy.” Scott Mattewman, The Stage

“Little Fish is short at just ninety minutes, but filled with fine music. Indeed, a sparkling and vivacious Laura Pitt-Pulford as Kathy sings about being Perfect - and it really is.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“Laura Pitt-Pulford is attractive as her perky best friend, and does full justice to the two best songs, Perfect and Remember Me.” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“Alana Maria is suitably fierce as scary flatmate Cinder.” Natasha Tipney, MusicOMH

“Laura Pitt-Pulford and Lee William-Davis stand out as Charlotte's friends Kathy and Marco. Their individual numbers are packed with emotion, moving but not over-sentimental” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“The cast attack the material with gusto and Lee William-Davis is particularly good as Marco, investing his brief, funny song about finding himself (complete with comedy "oms") with real humour and injecting a flash of anger and pain into his account of being assaulted by his ex-boyfriend.” Natasha Tipney, MusicOMH

“Lee William-Davis as the obligatory gay pal comes close to stopping the show with the climactic Little Fish.” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“Katie Foster-Barnes' sweetly-sung Anne opens Charlotte's eyes to the perils of emotional flotsam and stands in sharp contrast to the sassy Cinder of Alana Maria, the flatmate who tells it how it is.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“Nick Holder's cameo as the sleazy martini-quaffing Mr Bunder is very funny as is Michael Cantwell's pompous ex-boyfriend Robert” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“Michael Cantwell is brilliant as the terrifically terrible Robert, a little creepy, lacking any redeeming features and hilariously unpleasant to Charlotte.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“The rest of the cast are equally fine, which is a credit to Adam Lenson's skilled and sensitive direction.” Gerald Berkowitz, Theatreguide London

“There’s enough verve and bitter wit, both in LaChiusa’s writing and in Adam Lenson’s persuasive production, to keep it sharp rather than saccharine.” Sam Marlowe, The Times

“Director Adam Lenson has delivered a thoroughly enjoyable New York-flavoured musical.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“Director Adam Lenson and choreographer Nicholas Cunningham make good use of the open space provided by Bec Chippendale's creative and practical set which echoes the New York skyline.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“Bec Chippendale’s ingenious foldaway set, decorated in a range of aquatic blue hues, provides an elegant frame to a collection of technically accomplished, well-performed songs.” Scott Matthewman, The Stage

“Bec Chippendale's innovative set.” Theo Bosanquet, whatsonstage.com

“The band perch atop of Bec Chippendale's clever and versatile blue-brick set, the colour presumably meant to bring to mind a swimming pool, and their playing is excellent throughout.” Natasha Tipney, MusicOMH

“Nick Cunningham’s choreography provides some impressive routines” Scott Matthewman, The Stage

“The tight orchestrations of Richard Bates and Nick Cunningham's playful choreography.” Theo Bosanquet, whatsonstage.com

“Some endearing choreography by Nick Cunningham (the glittery swimming floats are a lovely touch).” Natasha Tipney, MusicOMH

“Musical director Richard Bates has done a great job with what is essentially an unconventional piece.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“A cast of excellent actor-singers who, aided by Nick Cunningham’s nimble choreography and Bec Chippendale’s ingeniously economical blue set, create a whole world of urban angst on the Finborough’s tiny stage. Its waters may not run all that deep; but they’re still well worth wading into.” Sam Marlowe, The Times

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Original London

6) State Fair (Scène) (Original London)

Joué durant  1 mois 1 semaine

Première preview: mar. 04 août 2009
Première: mar. 04 août 2009
Dernière: sam. 12 septembre 2009

Compositeur: Richard Rodgers •  
Parolier: Oscar Hammerstein II •  
Libettiste: Louis Mattioli • Tom Briggs •  
Metteur en scène: Thom Southerland •  
Chorégraphe: Sally Brooks •  
Avec: Philip Rham (Abel), Susan Travers (Melissa), Laura Main (Margy), Gareth Nash (Harry), Sion Lloyd (Wayne), Kellie Shirley (Emily), David Botham (Pat), Sarah Waddell, Anthony Wise, Robert Rees 


Commentaire: “State Fair” was Rodgers and Hammerstein’s only film musical, first made in 1945 and then re-made in 1962 with Pat Boone and Ann-Margret. It was first adapted into a stage musical in 1969, and premiered in St Louis, but it was not very well received. Twenty-three years later a completely new stage version was created, using a different combination of songs, and was staged at the 1995 Iowa State Fair. This version opened on Broadway in March 1996, the last show to be produced by the legendary David Merrick. It ran for just 110 performances, and was generally regarded as a piece of old-fashioned nostalgia . This fringe-theatre version was its European premiere and opened to generally positive reviews. Due to popular demand its original closing date of 22 August was extended three weeks to September 12th.  (plus) 


Presse: “This is nothing short of a miniature musical miracle.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“The Finborough is a wonderfully resourceful fringe theatre and somehow creates the feel of what a rather tautological lyric calls “the best state fair in our state”. A dozen cast members even manage to dance energetically in a space designed for a dozen Iowan piglets.” Benedict Nightingale, The Times

“The triumph of Thom Southerland’s production is to telescope this panoramic portrait of a rural family leaving the farm behind for a few days to visit the Iowa State Fair into the smallest, tightest...theatrical space imaginable, yet filling it with teaming life and bursting with irrepressible choreography and lovely, lilting songs, that are...beautifully rendered.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Thom Southerland's bouncy and ebullient production, which marks the work's European premiere, it turns out to be akin to a lightweight but equally tuneful Oklahoma!.” Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Anyone wanting the breadth of repertory a national theatre might be expected to provide should travel the West London axis between Richmond and its Orange Tree theatre and the Finborough near Earl’s Court. Both mix eclectic new plays with neglected British and foreign works. And neither lets its miniscule stage space limit ambition.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“There's a plentiful supply of memorable tunes.” Theo Bosanquet, WhatsOnStage

“Whilst State Fair doesn't have a You'll Never Walk Alone or a Shall we Dance, it does have Academy Award-winning It Might As Well Be Spring and more besides, most particularly It's a Grand Night for Singing and All I Owe Ioway which joyously bookend the interval.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“Some super tunes. So Far and It’s a Grand Night for Singing are among those that wouldn’t disgrace Oklahoma!.” Benedict Nightingale, The Times

“On the minuscule Finborough stage, with an eye wateringly large cast, the musical’s charms are proudly displayed like the back teeth of a prize hog.” Lucy Powell, Time Out

“Musically it’s meltingly good: comic barbershop numbers, wildly catchy show tunes and ballads that soar.” Lucy Powell, Time Out

“Much heart warming, toe-tapping fun is on offer.” Lucy Powell, Time Out

“In its melodic paean to middle America, I found this infinitely more enjoyable than some of Rodgers and Hammerstein's later, tendentious excursions into east-west politics.” Michael Billington, The Guardian
“As often happens in musicals, pleasure increases in inverse proportion to the size of the space.” Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Director, choreographer, pianist and cast ensure that…this State Fair is far more than a village fete.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“Beautifully handled by actors who are believably wholesome.” Rhoda Koening, The Independent

“The stand-outs being Siôn Lloyd as sheltered farmer's boy Wayne, Laura Main's equally-innocent Margy and Philip Rham as hog-serenading Abel.” Theo Bosanquet, WhatsOnStage

“There is particularly appealing work from the genial Siôn Lloyd and dulcet Laura Main.” Henry Hitchings, Evening Standard

“There’s also seriously good singing from principals that include Laura Main as Margy.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Main’s renditions of It Might As Well Be Spring and Next Time It Happens are simply ravishing.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Laura Main is sympathetic as Margy, suitably frail and dreamy.” Michael Darvell, Classical Source

“Laura Main is a beautifully yearning Margy Frake.” Lucy Powell, Time Out

“Laura Main, pure and simple as the truth never is, fresh-faced and smiling.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“Laura Main and Siôn Lloyd as the love-smitten Frake siblings, and Sarah Waddell and David Botham as the objects of their desire, perform with great elan.” Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Laura Main is outstanding as Margy Frake.” Robert Shore, Metro

“Robert Rees and Martin McCarthy were particularly engaging.” Johnny Fox, Londonist.com

“There’s particularly eye-catching work from ensemble member Martin McCarthy, who brings a free-wheeling virtuosity to every movement, but particularly a stand-out tap routine.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Played engagingly by Gareth Nash.” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

“Philip Rham and Susan Travers, as Ma and Pa, hold the show together with optimism and serenity.” Rhoda Koening, The Independent

“Superbly delivered by Phillip Rham.” Lucy Powell, Time Out

“Philip Rham’s Abel is the evening’s comic mainstay.” Robert Shore, Metro

“Anthony Wise contributes some nice cameos.” Michael Darvell, Classical Source

“Anthony Wise, as the curmudgeon in the apple barrel, provides a touch of tartness.” Rhoda Koening, The Independent

“Thom Southerland has not only mounted a heartfelt, touching revival, he has done so on the handkerchief-size playing area of the Finborough, where he stages a mini-hoedown that raises the roof.” Rhoda Koening, The Independent

“Choreographer Sally Brooks works wonders to ensure that the company execute nifty steps.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Some nifty footwork from choreographer Sally Brooks.” Michael Darvell, Classical Source

“Sally Brooks achieves choreographic miracles on a tiny stage, and Magnus Gilljam, as musical director and pianist, allows us to savour the texture of the songs.” Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Sally Brooks performs miracles with group choreography.” Timothy Ramsden, Reviewsgate

“This is the fringe at its best - talent and commitment replace budget, yet nothing feels stinted in Wai Yin Kwok’s clever design, or Magnus Gilljam’s strong musical direction.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Musical director Gilljam gets some terrific sounds from the cast and - corny though it may be to say it - it's a grand night for singing!” Sandra Giorgetti, British Theatre Guide

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Original

5) Ordinary Days (Original)

Joué durant  2 semaines

Première preview: lun. 03 novembre 2008
Première: lun. 03 novembre 2008
Dernière: lun. 17 novembre 2008

Compositeur: Adam Gwon •  
Parolier: Adam Gwon •  
Libettiste:  
Metteur en scène: Adam Lenson •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Julie Atherton, Kenneth Avery-Clark, Hayley Gallivan, Lee William-Davis 


Commentaire: This European premiere of a vibrant new musical introduces London to American composer and lyricist Adam Gwon, one of the most startlingly talented young musical dramatists working today. Recently named one of "50 to Watch" by The Dramatist magazine, his talents have been recognised with a much coveted $25,000 composer’s grant from Signature Theatre to develop a new full-length musical as part of the American Musical Voices Project: The Next Generation. His other musicals include the forthcoming Bernice Bobs Her Hair with librettist Julia Jordan, Ethan Frome with bookwriter Michael Ruby, and Lulu.  (plus) 


Presse: “London’s hottest ticket - the entire run was sold out ahead of last night’s opening. Now that’s not entirely surprising with a run this short and a theatre this small - but it also shows a hunger and appetite for this kind of work in London that is not being met elsewhere.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Gwon’s appearance in London with a show that only received its US premiere back in July is a heartening sign.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Told entirely in song (and brilliantly-written song at that), the action moves between two couples who are struggling to see what’s in front of their eyes, the sometimes literal bigger picture in their lives.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“The Finborough’s intimate space is transformed with a minimalist set.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“The accomplished cast taking us on a journey of growth, understanding and love.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“A bright and witty show, convincingly performed by four talented actors with verve and wonderful comic timing.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“The singing is exceptional...Their diction, pitch and vocal depth are spot-on, with not a single missed note.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“The music (performed by Richard Healey on piano and Stephanie Harsant on cello) perfectly underlines the action from the opening to the uplifting final song.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“One suspects this won’t be the last we hear of Adam Gwon. Highly recommended.” Carol Gordon, Whatsonstage

“It heralds a lot of welcome promise. Not least for the fact of that discovery - there are now new ways for composers to reach out with their work and find creators who want to put it on. This staging duly follows a mere four months after its first production at Penn State University.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Gwon - trained at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts - has a vibrant ear for melody and a strong lyrical voice.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“The show comes across as a through-sung cross between Jason Robert Brown’s Songs for a New World and Maltby and Shire’s Closer than Ever.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Director Adam Lenson does a smart job of revealing the patterns and connections that are being sketched here, and giving them a carefully blended sense of fluidity.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“Richard Healey and Stephanie Harsant anchor the songs with the lovely arrangements that they play on piano and cello respectively.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

“The production is also a testament to the love and commitment that the company bring to it, and Julie Atherton - arguably London’s leading lady of new musical voices thanks to her ongoing commitment to the Notes from New York series - is ideally complemented by the solid, full-voiced presence of Kenneth Avery-Clark, while Hayley Gallivan and Lee William-Davis bring a quirky sense of individuality to their characters.” Mark Shenton, The Stage

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Revival

4) Chu Chin Chow (Revival)

Joué durant  

Nb de représentations: 5 représentations
Première preview: lun. 14 juillet 2008
Première: lun. 14 juillet 2008
Dernière: ven. 18 juillet 2008

Compositeur: Frederic Norton •  
Parolier: Oscar Ashe •  
Libettiste: Oscar Ashe •  
Metteur en scène: Alex Sutton •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Edward Handoll (Abu Hasan), Camilla Bard ( Zahrat Al-Kalub ), Victoria Kruger ( Marjanah), Alan Cox ( Ali Baba), Will Barratt (Nur Al-Huda) , Alex Dower ( Kasim Baba ), Esther Biddle ( Alcolom), Adele Anderson (Mahbubah), David John Watton, Sarah Jo Carter, Hannah Richmond 


Commentaire: 5 performances, Sundays & Mondays
This present semi-staged and reduced scale production provided a welcome chance for musical buffs to re-visit one of the cornerstones of early musical theatre.  (plus) 


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Revival

3) John & Jen (Revival)

Joué durant  2 semaines

Première preview: dim. 04 novembre 2007
Première: dim. 04 novembre 2007
Dernière: lun. 19 novembre 2007

Compositeur: Andrew Lippa •  
Parolier: Tom Greenwald •  
Libettiste: Andrew Lippa • Tom Greenwald •  
Metteur en scène: Deborah Harry •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Helen Evans (Jen Tracy), John Hawkins (John Tracey/John) 


Commentaire: This two person chamber-musical originally played four months off-Broadway in 1995, and was described as “a beautifully lyrical and haunting musical, emotionally complex and resonant” .  (plus) 


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Musical
Revival

2) Maid of the Mountains (The) (Revival)

Joué durant  2 semaines

Première preview: dim. 03 décembre 2006
Première: dim. 03 décembre 2006
Dernière: dim. 17 décembre 2006

Compositeur: Harold Fraser-Simon •  
Parolier: Harry Graham •  
Libettiste: Frédéric Lonsdale •  
Metteur en scène: David Dorrian •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Robert Archibald, Elisabeth Baron, Christian Jon Billett, David Freedman, Andy Mace, Andrew Pepper, Alana Phillips, Laura Selwood, Sevan Stephan, Andrew Thwaite. 


Commentaire:   


Presse:

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical


Théâtre
Revival

1) Rat Trap (The) (Revival)

Joué durant  3 semaines

Première preview: Inconnu
Première: mar. 28 novembre 2006
Dernière: sam. 23 décembre 2006

Compositeur:  
Parolier:  
Libettiste: Noël Coward •  
Metteur en scène: Tim Luscombe •  
Chorégraphe:  
Avec: Federay Holmes, Catherine Hamilton, Gregory Finnegan, Steven O’Neill, Kathryn Sumner, Heather Chasen, Olivia Darnley 


Commentaire:   


Presse: "On stage in the West End at the Finborough Theatre after 80 years offstage"
Evening Standard ES Magazine

“Heroic effort by a young Coward...Written in 1918, when he was only 18 and not revived since a brief London run in 1926, Noel Coward's The Rat Trap is an absolute revelation.” Nicholas de Jongh, Evening Standard

“Tim Luscombe’s revival for the Finborough’s Forgotten Voices season makes for a most rewarding evening”
Jeremy Kingston, The Times

“This may be Coward juvenilia, but for sheer energy, engrossing performances and entertainment value the production knocks spots off almost every other straight play in London at the moment, and is sure to lead to further revivals or, better still, a transfer.”
John Thaxter, British Theatre Guide

“It’s certainly worth catching Tim Luscombe’s excellent production, unless you want to wait another 90 years for the chance.”
Alastair Smith, The Stage

“Tim Luscombe’s intense production makes ideal use of the Finborough’s tiny round space” Caroline McGinn, Time Out

“The rich entertainment provided by Tim Luscombe's production.”
Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Played in the round on the tightest of spaces, Luscombe and his cast vividly re-create an unjustly forgotten drama that is both like and interestingly unlike the plays that followed.”
Jeremy Kingston, The Times

“The [ forgotten voices season ]…This first time revival of 1926 Noel Coward play The Rat Trap is undoubtedly one of its high points...It provides some wonderful moments of theatre, especially in its more argumentative passages”
Alastair Smith, The Stage

“There hasn’t been anything twee or stuffy about any of the season of Forgotten Voices. They all demand to be heard, for their style, their wit, their unquenchable curiosity about people.”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“With aphoristic, witty shafts…Coward reminds us how the pleasures of free-love and adultery were lavishly sampled before London's naughty 1920s.”
Nicholas de Jongh, Evening Standard

“A fascinating revival...very interesting and well worth seeing...It is an astonishingly accomplished and psychologically mature work” C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“Its post-mortem of the death of creative love in marriage is shocking and pertinent”
Caroline McGinn, Time Out

“This is the first play Coward wrote, in 1918, when he was no older than the century…the marital troubles of his central couple show a firm grasp of the realities and an instinct for how to dramatise them.”
Jeremy Kingston, The Times

“This very interesting play. I applaud the Finborough for having released it from obscurity and Tim Luscombe for his brilliant direction… Anyone who is interested in Theatre should go and see it and so should those who aren’t – it is an opportunity to relish a piece of theatrical history which should not be missed.”
David Munro, IndieLondon.com

“Tim Luscombe’s fluid direction, which carefully balances stylish comedy of manners with truthful emotional psychology”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“Staged in the round, the actors barely inches from some of the audience, it proves an intense experience and the cast do not disappoint even at such close quarters.”
Alastair Smith, The Stage

“Catherine Hamilton, a fascinating find recently seen in The Madras House at the Orange Tree, conveys Sheila’s mixed emotions with beautifully expressive eyes and a controlled but thrilling vocal delivery”
John Thaxter, British Theatre Guide

“Catherine Hamilton is a real find as Sheila”
Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Catherine Hamilton’s Sheila becomes increasingly moving and real”
Jeremy Kingston, The Times

“Well led by Catherine Hamilton and Gregory Finnegan as the central pair”
Alastair Smith, The Stage

“Gregory Finnegan…an attractive, forceful portrayal”
John Thaxter, British Theatre Guide

“The supporting cast is equally strong...A dashing Sapphic performance by Federay Holmes” John Thaxter, British Theatre Guide

“Played with delicious wickedness and bang in period by Olivia Darnley”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“The throwaway wit and flyaway gestures of Federay Holmes’s Olive”
Jeremy Kingston, The Times

“The casting of Federay Holmes as the couple’s progressive friend Olive brings the androgynous elegance of Coward’s mature persona into his youthful play - her languid drawl and her judgments are ahead of their time but, like Coward’s wit, are compassionate and candid as well as oblique.”
Caroline McGinn, Time Out

“Kathryn Sumner is radiantly beautiful in Grecian splendour as the mellifluously voiced Bohemian writer Naomi”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“Heather Chasen and Olivia Darnley’s vivid characterizations”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“The production’s highlights come from the well-realised supporting cast - Federay Holmes’ gossip journalist, acting as Sheila’s confidante, Olivia Darnley as the coquette who convinces Keld to play away and Heather Chasen’s hugely entertaining…servant.” Alastair Smith, The Stage

“Even in early Coward, the minor figures also possess an abundant life neatly caught by Olivia Darnley as a predatory ex-chorus girl and Heather Chasen as a trundling maid announcing "marriage is a snare".” Michael Billington, The Guardian

“Sublimely recreated by Heather Chasen in a classic comedy maid performance that should be enshrined for its focus, reality and timing”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“As the shrewd, down-to-earth maid, Heather Chasen shuffles around in lace-up shoes and a grim cardigan almost down to her knees, while wearing an expression of determined inscrutability. Her magnificent vintage performance - quiet, truthful, comic - is the evening's authentic Cowardian delight.”
Nicholas de Jongh, Evening Standard

“Heather Chasen as Burrage the maid, put upon and put down, gave the usual splendid supporting performance we have come to expect from this very accomplished actress.” David Munro, IndieLondon.com

“The performance of the evening is a sly turn by Heather Chasen, with little more than forty lines or so, playing the shrewd, long-suffering cook Burrage, an Edwardian relic with a cut-glass accent that renders ‘marriage’ as ‘merridge’ to devastating comedy effect, while managing to tell her innermost thoughts with the merest flicker of an eyelid. Do catch this superb veteran at the top of her form.”
John Thaxter, British Theatre Guide

“These rediscoveries open your mind to all sorts of connected historical facts that it’s impossible not to be intrigued by; it’s a sort of living theatre museum; a cabinet of treasures from the theatre of the recent past, the past that our theatrical consciousness is built on”
C J Sheridan, Rogues and Vagabonds

“Unseen in London since 1926, this early Noel Coward play is something of a turn-up for the books. Coward wrote it when he was 18, but already you see him, as a precocious stripling, sketching out the theme that was to haunt his later work: the idea that talent is best fulfilled by shedding emotional commitments...What is fascinating is detecting hints of the Coward to come. The battle of the two fractious egotists clearly anticipates the cushion-throwing tantrums of Elyot and Amanda in Private Lives…Coward also prefigures his later ability to give life to eccentrically named off-stage characters: we never see Clara Dewlap or Evangeline Featherstone, but we believe in them.”
Michael Billington, The Guardian

Plus d'infos sur cette production:

Plus d'infos sur ce musical