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Musical (1996)


Musique: Claude-Michel Schonberg
Paroles: Alain Boublil • Claude-Michel Schonberg • Edward Hardy • Herbert Kretzmer
Livret: Alain Boublil • Claude-Michel Schonberg

Type de série: Original
Théâtre: Prince Edward Theatre (Londres - Angleterre)
Durée : 1 an 7 mois 3 semaines
Nombre : 695 représentations
Première Preview : vendredi 21 juin 1996
Première : mercredi 10 juillet 1996
Dernière : samedi 28 février 1998
Mise en scène : Declan Donnellan
Chorégraphie : Bob Avian
Avec : Iain Glenn (Arnaud du Thil), Juliette Caton (Bertrande de Rols), Matt Rawle (Martin Guerre), Michael Matus (Benoit), Jerome Pradon (Guillaume), Ann Emery, Sheila Reid, Julia Sutton, Susan Jane Tanner, Martin Turner.
(In the revised version the role of Bertrande was shared with Rebecca Lock)
Commentaires : Based on the 1982 French film “The Return of Martin Guerre”, and a 1993 re-make “Sommersby”, this was a £3.75 million mega-musical which had apparently been seven years in the planning. The original previews were cancelled and delayed for three weeks because of technical difficulties, leading to threatened court-action from disappointed ticket-holders demanding compensation for expenses incurred. It was an impressive, worthy but somewhat dark and humourless show and received a series of very unenthusiastic reviews. Business dropped off, but rather than abandon the show, Cameron Mackintosh spent another half million pounds on a major re-write, including new songs (and the services of yet another lyricist, Stephen Clark) and much revision. Four months after opening, the show closed for three days and was then re-launched as the “New Martin Guerre”. It was shorter and more focussed on the romantic story, with less religious conflict and more emphasis on the character of Bertrande. However, it closed in February 1998, in spite of winning the Olivier Award for Best New Musical, allegedly with total losses of £7 million.



Série 1

Théâtre: Prince Edward Theatre (Londres - Angleterre)
Durée : 3 mois 2 semaines
Nombre :
Première Preview : ven. 21 juin 1996
Première : mer. 10 juillet 1996
Dernière : dim. 27 octobre 1996
Mise en scène : Declan Donnellan
Chorégraphie : Bob Avian
Avec : Iain Glenn (Arnaud du Thil), Juliette Caton (Bertrande de Rols), Matt Rawle (Martin Guerre), Michael Matus (Benoit), Jerome Pradon (Guillaume), Ann Emery, Sheila Reid, Julia Sutton, Susan Jane Tanner, Martin Turner.
Commentaires : The first version premièred in London at the Prince Edward Theatre on 10 July 1996. Edward Hardy worked on the lyrics and Declan Donnellan directed. It was a spectacular production but not only were the reviews mixed there were also some major concerns expressed by the public and the creative team alike. In the early weeks the creative team worked hard and quickly to clarify the narrative, rearrange some of the material and remove one pretty but non-essential song. But the story did not have the emotional tug on the heartstrings that their previous work had. Stephen Clark took over as co-lyricist and small changes were continually being made.
Presse :
Les critiques de la version originale (version 1) étaient majoritairement mauvaises:
"Its book lacks real narrative thrust and excitement" (NICHOLAS DE JONGH, EVENING STANDARD, 7.11.96)

Les Miz and Miss Saigon had a mélodie sweep and emotional clarity signally absent from Martin Guerre" (MICHAEL CO-VENEY, OBSERVER, 7.14.96);

"In Declan Donnellans stylistically-insecure pro¬duction the dramatic métronome has stopped ticking" (ROBERT BUTLER, INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY, 7.14.96);

"Martin Guerre îs a bore, and a surprïsingly inemeient bore" (ALISTAIR MACAULAY, FINANCIAL TIMES, 7.11,96).

Certaines étaient un peu plus favorables... :
"Martin Guerre is an admirable, high-quality company création ... a beautifully produced addition to London's theatreland" (STEVE GRANT, TIME OUT, 7.17,96)

"For the third time in little more than a décade, or so it would seem from ail but about two of the first dozen reviews, Alain Boubiil and Claude-Michel Schonberg hâve written a great and classic musical which nobody likes except the public. .Martin Guerre is as much a masterpiece of musical magie and mystery as that earlier score (Les Misérables)" (Sheridan Morley, Spectator, 7.20.96).



Série 2

Théâtre: Prince Edward Theatre (Londres - Angleterre)
Durée : 1 an 3 mois 2 semaines
Nombre :
Première Preview : ven. 01 novembre 1996
Première : lun. 11 novembre 1996
Dernière : sam. 28 février 1998
Mise en scène : Declan Donnellan
Chorégraphie : Bob Avian
Avec : Iain Glenn (Arnaud du Thil), Rebecca Lock (Bertrande de Rols), Matt Rawle (Martin Guerre), Michael Matus (Benoit), Jerome Pradon (Guillaume), Ann Emery, Sheila Reid, Julia Sutton, Susan Jane Tanner, Martin Turner.
Commentaires : The first version premièred in London at the Prince Edward Theatre on 10 July 1996. Edward Hardy worked on the lyrics and Declan Donnellan directed. It was a spectacular production but not only were the reviews mixed there were also some major concerns expressed by the public and the creative team alike. In the early weeks the creative team worked hard and quickly to clarify the narrative, rearrange some of the material and remove one pretty but non-essential song. But the story did not have the emotional tug on the heartstrings that their previous work had. Stephen Clark took over as co-lyricist and small changes were continually being made.
Presse :
Quand Martin Guerre a réouvert au Prince Edward, la presse a été nettement meilleure:
"The narrative is clear and full of suspense, there are some sharper lyrics (by Stephen Clark), and the emotional volume has been dramatkally turned up" Georgina Brown, Mail on Sunâay, 11.17,96

"The relaunched version at the Prince Edward at least has a narrative drive and cohérence missing from the original" Michael Billington, Guardian, 11.13,96

"The pièce has now been rejigged and, in my view, significantly improved" Benedict Nightingale, The Times, 11.13,96

"The show has been restructured to make it both clearer and more plau­sible,..it now has scènes of real power and passion, while its achingiy romantic mélodies linger resonantly in the mernory" Charles Spencer, Daiîy Telegraph, 11.12.96





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