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Théâtre ()


De Peter Shaffer (1964)


Résumé: Intent on the conquest of Peru, Spanish soldier Pizarro entices recruits with the promise of inconceivable riches, while the Church claims the cause for Christianity. The ensuing clash between two cultures leaves thousands of unarmed Inca troops slaughtered and sparks an intense battle of wills between the sun-god and his captor, as the Spaniards plunder for gold.


Type de série: Revival
Théâtre: National Theatre (Londres - Angleterre)
Salle : Olivier Theatre
Durée : 4 mois
Nombre : 72 représentations
Première Preview : jeudi 30 mars 2006
Première : mercredi 12 avril 2006
Dernière : samedi 12 août 2006
Mise en scène : Trevor Nunn
Chorégraphie :
Avec : Alun Armstrong (Pizarro), Paterson Joseph (Atahuallpa), Philip Voss (Miguel Estete), Israel Aduramo, Natasha Bain, Micah Balfour, Dwayne Barnaby, Tristan Beint, Ralph Birtwell, Martin Carroll, Oliver Cotton, Jim Creighton, Branwell Donaghey, Darrell D Silva, Andrew Frame, Bradley Freegard, Daniel Lindquist, Richard Lintern, George Daniel Long, Andrew McDonald, Tam Mutu, Terel Nugent, Owen Oakeshott, Gary Oliver, Bhasker Patel, Paul Ritter, Nataylia Roni, Douglas Scott Franklin, Amit Shah, Malcolm Storry, Michael Taibi, Oliver Tompsett, Ewart James Walters.
Presse : NICHOLAS DE JONGH for THE EVENING STANDARD says, "A spectacular theatrical epic." PAUL TAYLOR for THE INDEPENDENT says, "Old-fashioned in stage-craft and style." MICHAEL BILLINGTON for THE GUARDIAN says, "While the play was a startling antidote to 60s naturalism, what now seems more interesting is Shaffer's understanding of the imperialist instinct in which the conquest of the Incas becomes a metaphor for modern Iraq." CHARLES SPENCER for THE DAILY TELEGRAPH says, "Lumbering production by Trevor Nunn, full of empty displays of ritual, dodgy choreography and naff mime sequences" BENEDICT NIGHTINGALE for THE TIMES says, "There’s much to admire in Nunn’s use of a bare, round, wooden stage with plenty of gorgeous costumes but a minimum of props."


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