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L'événement culturel de l'été à Bruxelles!    

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Musical (1932)


Musique: Jacques Offenbach
Paroles: Henri Meilhac • Ludovic Halévy
Livret: Henri Meilhac • Ludovic Halévy

Helen abandons Menelaus, her dolt of a husband, and goes to live with Paris, Prince of Troy, which leads to the ten year siege of the Trojan capital. During the siege we meet Calchas, the Soothsayer saying the sooth, Menelaus wearing a small bowler hat, Juno and Minerva squabbling over the Golden Apple, Orestes and Pylades wearing tights, an over-worked Mercury muddling his messages, a limping Achilles, a black-bearded Agamemnon., and, of course, a veritable troupe of Mr Cochran’s young ladies.

This was an updated revision of Offenbach’s “La Belle Helene”, first performed in Paris in 1864 and in London in 1866. The re-written version was a parody of the original, which was itself a parody of Homer’s poem. As such it did not please everyone, with some finding it “too silly for words”. However, all agreed it had spectacular scenery and costumes and superb dancing - though some felt it was more a variety show and revue rather than a musical comedy.





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Version 1

Helen! (1932-01-Adelphi Theatre-London)

Type de série: Original
Théâtre: Adelphi Theatre (Londres - Angleterre)
Durée :
Nombre : 194 représentations
Première Preview : samedi 30 janvier 1932
Première : samedi 30 janvier 1932
Dernière : Inconnu
Mise en scène : Max Reinhardt
Chorégraphie : Leonide Massine
Avec : Helen (Evelyn Laye), George Robey (Menelaus), Bruce Carfax (Paris), W.H. Berry (Calchas), Winifred Davis (June), Shirley Dale (Minerva), Desiree Ellinger (Orestes), Joy Spring (Pylades), Hay Petrie (Mercury), Roy Russell (Achilles), Leslie Jones (Agamemnon)
Commentaires :
This was an updated revision of Offenbach’s “La Belle Helene" first performed in Paris in 1864 and in London in 1866. The re-written version was a parody of the original, which was itself a parody of Homer’s poem. As such it did not please everyone, with some finding it “too silly for words”. However, all agreed it had spectacular scenery and costumes and superb dancing - though some felt it was more a variety show and revue rather than a musical comedy.
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